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SPECIFICATIONS
Model: FuntanaX 100 ARF
Manufacturer: Hangar 9
Distributor: Horizon Hobby Inc.
Type: 3D flyer
Length: 68.5 in.
Wingspan: 69.5 in.
Wing area: 1,108 sq. in.
Weight: 8.2 to 9.5 lb.
Actual weight: 9.23 lb.
Wing loading: 19.22 oz./sq. ft.
Engine req'd: .60 to 1.00
2-stroke, .90 to 1.25 4-stroke
Radio req'd: 4-channel w/6 servos (2
aileron, 2 elevator, 1 rudder, 1 throttle)
Price: $219.99

HIGHLIGHTS
» Very maneuverable; extremely stable »
Extremely lightweight construction
materials » Attractive color scheme »
High-quality hardware

TEST GEAR
Radio: JR 388S, 8-channel JR receiver,
JR DS9411SA Advanced Sport digital
servos (2 aileron, 2 elevator and 1
rudder) and aJR 537 standard servo for
the throttle
Motor: Saito FA 1.25a 4-stroke
Fuel: Wildcat 15% nitro
Propeller: APC 16x4W













Because the servos are installed in the
fuselage's aft section, the large radio
compartment seems rather empty. The
preassembled fuel tank is held in place
by two rubber bands with foam between
it and the former it rests on, and the
receiver is wrapped in foam and
mounted on a plywood tray that is
attached to the side longerons with wood
screws. The antenna tube is
preinstalled. For balance purposes, the
battery was installed on the left side right
next to the fuel tank.












Because the servos are installed in the
fuselage's aft section, the large radio
compartment seems rather empty. The
preassembled fuel tank is held in place
by two rubber bands with foam between
it and the former it rests on, and the
receiver is wrapped in foam and
mounted on a plywood tray that is
attached to the side longerons with wood
screws. The antenna tube is
preinstalled. For balance purposes, the
battery was installed on the left side right
next to the fuel tank.













Because the servos are installed in the
fuselage's aft section, the large radio
compartment seems rather empty. The
preassembled fuel tank is held in place
by two rubber bands with foam between
it and the former it rests on, and the
receiver is wrapped in foam and
mounted on a plywood tray that is
attached to the side longerons with wood
screws. The antenna tube is
preinstalled. For balance purposes, the
battery was installed on the left side right
next to the fuel tank.
For 3D pilots who are ready to advance, Hangar
9's FuntanaX 100 is the model to get. For 3D
pilots who are already advanced, it's a must-have!
Designed exclusively for Hangar 9 by Italy's most
famous aerobatic pilot, Sebastiano Silvestri, the
FuntanaX 100 is based on his very successful
KatanaS TOC design, and it will perform those 3D
maneuvers with ease.

Constructed of lightweight materials, covered with
UltraCote that simulates Sebastiano's signature
trim scheme and powered by a Saito FA 1.25a 4-
stroke engine, it truly is a winner in terms of looks
and performance. As with all lightweight 3D
models, handle the airframe carefully.

OPENING THE BOX
The FuntanaX 100 was neatly packaged with all of
its main components protected in plastic bags that
were separated by cardboard dividers for
protection. The fuselage, wings, Side Force
Generators and tail feathers are constructed of
CNC lite-ply, balsa and Styrofoam and are
covered with an extremely attractive UltraCote
color scheme. The kit includes a prepainted
fiberglass cowl and wheel pants, a plastic canopy,
carbon-fiber landing gear, flying wires, antirotation
pins and wing tube, a tailwheel bracket, a decal
sheet, a preinstalled plastic antenna tube and a
complete heavy-duty hardware package that
includes motor mounts, a preassembled fuel tank,
all linkages with the required connecting ends, CA
hinges, wheels and a full complement of screws,
bolts, nuts, wheel collars, washers, axles, etc. A
43-page manual with black-and-white photos is
included. I read it thoroughly before I started the
assembly. To complete the model, I added Saito's
FA 1.25a 4-stroke engine, an APC 16x4W
propeller, a Tru-Turn 2 3/4-inch spinner, a JR
388S computer radio with receiver, 5 JR
DS9411SA digital servos, a JR 537 standard
servo for throttle, five 18-inch servo extensions, a
Du-Bro remote fuel filler, JR heavy-duty servo
arms and foam rubber/bubble-wrap for the
radio/fuel tank installation.

ASSEMBLY
Wing. After a thorough check to ensure that all of
the listed parts were in the box, I sealed the edges
of the covering and removed the wrinkles. With
their extension leads, the aileron servos are
attached first; their mounting holes are predrilled.
Attach the ailerons using the provided CA hinges
(all hinge slots were precut). It is best to trial-fit
everything before you permanently attach it. To
be on the safe side, before I CA'd the hinges, I
attached the Generators to make sure that the
ailerons didn't hit them. Next, I attached the
aileron control horns with screws (not bolts). Put
CA in each hole before you attach the horns.
Assemble the aileron control linkages using the
supplied 2 7/8-inch threaded rods, nylon ball
links, metal clevises and the heat-shrink keepers.
Hook up the servos and determine how they will
move, and then hook up the control linkages.
Place the ball link 1 inch out on the servo arm
from the spline's center. Although the photo
shows the linkages attached to the bottom of the
servo arm, I attached them to the top because it
created a direct line from the servo arm to the
control horn.

Now seal your aileron hinge gaps with some
covering (do not skip this step, and do this on the
bottom side only; I used orange MonoKote), and
then epoxy in the antirotation pins. Attach the
wing halves to each side as shown, and follow the
steps to attach the wing fillets. Be sure to tape
some plastic wrap between the wing and the
fuselage to prevent the epoxy from getting on the
fuselage sides. The wings are now complete.

Tail feathers. Attach the horizontal and vertical
stabilizers with 30-minute epoxy, and while this is
curing, assemble the remaining aft fuselage
servos and their lead extensions. Install the
elevator servos (their holes are not predrilled),
and check to see that the heavy-duty servo arms
will clear the port-side horizontal stabilizer. I had to
cut off about 3/8 inch for clearance. I did the same
for the remaining two servo arms. Attach the
elevators with the CA hinges, and assemble their
linkages; the left side uses the 3 7/8-inch
threaded rod, and the right uses the 5 1/2-inch
rod. Then use the predrilled holes in the elevator
halves to attach the control horns. Hook up the
radio to center the servos, determine their
direction and then hook up the elevator linkages.
Note that the ball links are also 1 inch from the
spline's center. Now seal the elevators' hinge
gap—very important.

Next, attach the tailwheel bracket and the rudder
as described in the manual; make sure that there
isn't any kind of binding when the surface is
deflected. If binding occurs, you may have to
carve out the tailwheel wire's slot a little. Attach
the rudder's control horn and the linkage; make
sure that the ball link is attached to the bottom of
the servo arm.






















The predrilled aileron servo and control-
horn holes on the control surfaces were
great timesavers.












Both of the FuntanaX’s color schemes
are very attractive. The X100’s orange
and the X50’s yellow bottom wing and
horizontal stabilizer help to eliminate
orientation quandaries.
LANDING GEAR, ENGINE & COWL. Assemble the
gear as shown. Holes for the fiberglass wheel
pants’ attachment bolts have been predrilled in the
carbon-fiber landing gear. You may have to carve
the wheel pants to get the correct fit and to line
them up with each other. Once set, put thin CA or
Loctite on the bolts and wheel-collar setscrews to
prevent them from loosening.

Install the motor mounts, engine and throttle
servo. With the Saito FA 1.25a, I had to exchange
the motor mount’s upper-right-hand side machine-
head bolt for a socket-head bolt and recess it into
the motor mount to allow the engine to be placed
far enough aft to fall within the required 5 1/8
inches from the firewall. Hook up the throttle
linkage and install the preassembled fuel tank.
Place a small piece of foam between the tank’s
resting former and the tank. I used a ball link on
the carburetor’s arm rather than a Z-bend.

Make the cowl cutouts and attach the cowl with the
supplied bolts (their blind nuts are preinstalled in
the fuselage). Use a small piece of fuel tubing on
each bolt to help hold it in place.

Radio gear, hatch & canopy. I installed the switch
in the precut slot on the fuselage’s port side,
wrapped the receiver in foam and then used tape
to attach it to its plywood plate. Use the provided
screws to attach the plate to its location, and
thread the antenna down the preinstalled antenna
tube. Do not attach the battery to the plate as
shown in the directions. It will be needed up front
for balance purposes.

Attach the hatch, and trial-fit the canopy. When
satisfied with its fit, attach it as indicated with Pacer’
s Formula 560 canopy glue. Use fuel tubing on the
hatch bolts, too. The hatch has threaded
aluminum receptacles at the aft end into which the
bolts are threaded.
IN THE AIR
I powered my FuntanaX with a Saito FA 1.25a 4-
stroke engine with an APC 16x4W propeller. I used
Wildcat 15% nitro fuel, and this combination
provided plenty of power. With the high-end needle
valve set at 2 1/2 turns out, the engine ran
perfectly. On the grass strip, the FuntanaX 100
used 30 feet for the takeoff roll at half power.
Because of the built-in right thrust, the plane
requires barely any right rudder to keep the
tracking straight. Low rates for takeoff are required.

GENERAL FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS
STABILITY. Extremely stable during takeoffs,
landings, hands-off flight and gliding.
TRACKING. The FuntanaX 100 tracks straight and
true until commanded to do otherwise. Two clicks
of up-trim were required. Lateral and yaw stability
were perfect.
AEROBATICS. Large control surfaces with a
tremendous amount of throw allow the FuntanaX
100 to twist and flip within a very small airspace.
Side Force Generators help to stabilize knife-edge
flight. It conquers all 3D maneuvers with
confidence and stability. Use your radio’s expo
feature to soften the middle of the sticks’ input
response. Without the expo, 3D elevator input
could cause an inadvertent snap roll.
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Hangar 9
Funtana X 100 ARF
By Roger Post
Blistering 3D performance in an
ultra-stable design

FINAL ASSEMBLY
Attach the carbon-fiber tail supports with 30-
minute epoxy to ensure that the horizontal
stabilizer halves won’t collapse under 3D
aerodynamic stresses. Attach the Side Force
Generators with the supplied bolts and washers,
and apply the decals (they’re perforated so you
don’t have to cut them); the FuntanaX assembly is
finished. The balance point ranges from 6 1/8 to 6
3/4 inches from the leading edge. I balanced the
model at the 6 1/2-inch point; I had to move the JR
1400mAh battery pack all the way forward to the
left side of the firewall and put three ounces of
lead weight in the forward built-up box to which the
motor mounts are attached. Using a protractor, set
the control throws (given in degrees), and be sure
to use 50- percent expo for the 3D rates and 25
percent for the low rates. Once the control throws
have been programmed, use a heat gun to shrink
the small pieces of tubing around the clevises.
Charge the batteries, and the FuntanaX 100 is
ready to fly.

FINAL THOUGHTS
Rome wasn’t built in a day, but the Hangar 9
FuntanaX 100 almost was. It goes together
quickly; sealing the hinge gaps and fitting the
wheels pants were the only time-consuming steps.
Hangar 9 has taken care of most of the busy work
for you, and any modeler will appreciate that.

When the word gets out, every 3D pilot will want
this one, so beat the rush, and order yours today.
You’ll be glad you did!  











The control linkages are threaded metal
rods with nylon ball links on one end and
metal clevises on the other. Small pieces
of heat-shrink tubing ensure that the
clevises do not pop open. The supplied
carbon-fiber flying wires support the
horizontal stabilizer’s structure.











To install the Saito FA 1.25a, I had to
exchange the motor mount’s upper-right
machine-head bolt with a socket-head
bolt and recess it into the motor mount
so that the engine could be placed far
enough aft to fall within the required 5
1/8 inches from the firewall. I also
reconfigured the throttle linkage and
used a ball link on the carburetor arm.
The Saito FA 1.25a engine with an
APC 16x4W propeller provided plenty
of power for 3D maneuvers, including
vertical climbs.

CONTROL THROWS
ELEVATOR: 50 deg. up, 51 deg. down
(3D), 50% expo; 11.5 deg. up, 13 deg.
down (low), 25% expo
AILERON: 34.5 deg. up and down
(3D), 50% expo; 17 deg. up and down
(low), 25% expo
RUDDER: 52 deg. right and left (3D),
50% expo; 24 deg. right and left (low),
25% expo
GLIDE PERFORMANCE. For power-off or deadstick landings, expect long, flat glides with a
slight tendency to float.
STALLS. At shallow angles of attack (AoA), the model barely stalls. At high AoA, the nose
falls forward but not too sharply.

PILOT DEBRIEFING. This airplane is so stable in all flight regimes that you feel as though it
is flying itself. Low rates provide plenty of control-surface movement to accomplish all
maneuvers, and when you switch it to high rates, the action really intensifies! It is the easiest
model to hover that I have ever flown, and there wasn’t any proverse or adverse roll or
pitching or tucking tendencies in knife-edge flight.

The engine/propeller combination was right on the money, and it provided plenty of power
for all maneuvers. With its super low-speed landing characteristics and on low rates, the
FuntanaX 100 can be brought in at a crawl. It flies as great as it looks